BRUNOROMEIRA_SMALL.jpg

HELLO! I'M bruno.

Bruno joined INL to develop, both theoretically and experimentally, novel disruptive nanoscale light-emitting diode sources for neural-inspired nanocircuits.

 

 

About Bruno romeira

Bruno Romeira received his Diploma degree in physics and chemistry from the University of the Algarve (Faro, Portugal) in 2006, and the PhD of physics (summa cum laude) and the title of European PhD at the same university, jointly with the University of Glasgow (UK) and the University of Seville (Spain) in 2012. He then held a postdoctoral appointment at the Microwave Photonics Research Laboratory of the University of Ottawa (2013-2014), and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellowship at the Applied Physics Department of the Eindhoven University of Technology (2015-2017). His research cuts across several disciplines in applied physics and engineering, which include semiconductor physics, quantum electronics, solid state nano-optoelectronic and nano-photonic devices, and nonlinear dynamics. He has joined INL to develop, both theoretically and experimentally, novel disruptive nanoscale light-emitting diode sources for neural-inspired nanocircuits. Bruno Romeira received in 2009 the “Young Researchers Incentive Programme” award from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Portugal, and he is one of the recipients of the “2011 IEEE Photonics Society Graduate Student Fellowship”, from the IEEE Photonics Society, USA. Bruno Romeira's PhD thesis entitled “Dynamics of Resonant Tunneling Diode Optoelectronic Oscillators” was awarded the "Best PhD Thesis in Optics and Photonics in Portugal in 2012" by the Portuguese Society of Optics and Photonics (SPOF).

BRUNOROMEIRA.jpg

 

The Cofund project

Nanoscale light-emitting diodes

We are currently witnessing an exponential growth of Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems to help humans dealing with highly complex tasks, such as sensing and learning, needed for the Internet of Things and to handle with Big Data. While the implementation of AI systems using computer algorithms of neural networks is emerging rapidly, scientists are just taking the very first steps in the development of the hardware elements of an artificial brain, specifically high-bandwidth and low power consumption neuromorphic (neuron-like) chips. The aim of the COFUND project is to perform cutting-edge research on fast and energy-efficient nonlinear nano-light-emitting diodes (nanoLEDs) at an unconventional scale, that will enable the generation of ultrafast optical pulses, or spikes, analogous to the chemical signalling in biological neurons. Using advanced micro- and nano-fabrication, electro-optical characterization and modelling methods, this project aims at emulating the biophysics of spiking neurons and dynamic synapses using the fabricated nonlinear nanoLED sources. This project will have a strong impact on a broad spectrum of scientific fields, namely materials science, nanoscale optoelectronics, optical physics, nanophotonics, nanoscale inorganic LEDs, and complex nonlinear dynamics.

NANOTRAIN_LOGO.png